Dog Poops In House After Being Outside

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Dog Poops In House

Do you have the frustrating problem of your dog pooping indoors after taking them outside? You’re not alone – many other pet owners experienced the same. This is why we want to help you out by writing this article to give you more tips and advice.

No one wants their carpets soiled with dog poop (or pee, for that matter). That’s why we want to help our dogs not do their business indoors, but not traumatize them with constant yelling! A proper approach is important when addressing dog accidents in the house.

Why is my dog pooping indoors?

There are many reasons why your dog is likely to poop inside the house, especially after going outside. Here are some common ones:

1. Your dog is easily distracted by outside factors

Whether it’s another dog passing by, a lot of people walking around, background noise, uncomfortable weather, or even some garden dwellers, your dog will get distracted if there are too many outside factors to consider. If your dog isn’t focused on doing their business, they might forget about it entirely, and then when they come home, that’s when they’ll make a mess.

If this is the case, your dog might also poop a little but it won’t be enough. They might still poop when you take them indoors. That’s because they were distracted by so many factors when they go outside that they forgot to finish.

Another reason why your dog can be distracted is that you might show signs of playtime, which you shouldn’t. Many pet owners say that it’s better to keep the pooping time as boring as possible to avoid associating it with fun time.

2. Your dog hasn’t been fully socialized

If your dog appears scared of random people and even other dogs, it will be quite a problem. It means that your dog hasn’t been socialized early and is quite uncomfortable with strangers. Ask your breeder or the person you got the dog from if they have been socialized and when – this will give you an idea.

Dogs that weren’t taken outside too often aren’t very good with strangers, so don’t be surprised if that’s the case with your dog and if they keep barking, circling, and whining if they see other dogs or people.

3. There’s something medically wrong with your dog

Your dog could have some underlying health condition, such as kidney problems, UTI, parasites, hormonal issues, or perhaps something gastrointestinal. Sometimes, dogs with joint problems will also have trouble trying to poop due to the squatting action.

For these troubles, it’s best to take your dog to the vet. Dogs that take specific medications may also experience pooping problems so it’s best to ask the vet about it, too. Your veterinarian will give you a prescription based on their diagnosis of your dog.

4. Your dog hasn’t been potty-trained (or didn’t have enough training)

Sure, you might have let your dog pee and poop in their potty pads just fine when they were puppies. However, sometimes, pet owners expect too much from their dogs and want them to be independent right away, which is a big mistake most of the time.

A puppy/dog that has been properly potty-trained will never make accidents in the house in 6 months or more. If your dog still does their business inside, it could probably mean that they are not properly trained yet when it comes to going potty on their own.

Potty training is one of the most challenging parts of keeping a dog/puppy. It takes a lot of effort and guts to make your dog independent and not make a mess inside the house. There are many techniques to do this such as putting them on a leash before going potty and letting them off afterward.

Aside from that, perhaps your dog isn’t getting any incentive when it comes to pooping or peeing outside so they’re probably not doing it. You can remedy this by offering treats after they’ve finished doing their business to reinforce the positive association.

5. Your dog might not like grass

Did your dog come from a shelter or was rescued from a puppy mill? There’s a big chance that your dog is used to just peeing and pooping anywhere, and they like to do it especially on concrete surfaces.

Dogs, in nature, preferred doing their business on rough surfaces like grass. If your dog becomes accustomed to the pavement for a large portion of their life, that’s a big factor for them. Perhaps the reason why your dog poops indoors rather than outdoors is that they’re used to flat surfaces rather than grassy areas.

How do I get my dog to poop outside instead of indoors?

With the different reasons we mentioned above, how exactly do you get Fido to poop outdoors instead of making a mess on your carpet? Here are a couple of solutions:

1. Avoid distracting your dog when pooping

When a dog does their business outside, be sure to do it in an area where there’s little to no foot traffic or external noise. Most pet owners take their dogs outside during hours where people aren’t usually outdoors.

2. Reward your dog each time they successfully poop outside

Dogs will associate eliminating time with positive rewards if you give them treats each time they successfully finish. Don’t give them the treat too early – wait for them to finish.

3. Don’t yell at your dog when they make accidents indoors

Negative disciplining will discourage your dog from being close to you. To avoid unsightly behaviors, never shout at your dog if they make accidents indoors. Instead, simply pick them up and tell them “no” so they’ll know what they did was wrong but without feeling too scared about it.

4. Keep a constant potty area outside

To avoid getting your dog distracted too easily, get them to poop and pee in one spot only. Pick a spot that doesn’t have a lot of distractions and keep that spot only for the dog.

5. Ensure a proper feeding schedule

Sometimes, ensuring your dog gets regularly fed will help you guess when they need to go. Simply make a set routine or schedule for feeding so it’s easy to estimate when your dog needs to do their business.

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